On Shaky Ground

Author: Norma Hayes Bagnall
Editor: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 0826273106
File Size: 43,40 MB
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Although most Americans associate earthquakes with California, the tremors that shook the Mississippi valley in southeast Missouri from December 16, 1811, through February 7, 1812, are among the most violent quakes to hit the North American continent in recorded history. Collectively known as the New Madrid earthquakes, these quakes affected more than 1 million square miles. By comparison, the 1906 San Francisco earthquake affected only 60,000 square miles, less than one-sixteenth the area of the New Madrid earthquakes. Scientists believe that each of the three greatest tremors would have measured more than 8.0 on the Richter scale, had that measuring device been in place in 1811. Vibrations were felt from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic coast and from Mexico to Canada. The quake zone was in constant movement during this period. Five towns in three states disappeared, islands vanished in the Mississippi River, lakes formed where there had been none before, and the river flowed backward for a brief period. Providing eyewitness accounts from people both on the land and on the river, Bagnall captures the fears of the residents through their tales about the smells and dark vapors that filled the air, the cries of the people, the bawling of animals, and the constant roar of the river and its collapsing banks. On Shaky Ground also traces the history of the founding of New Madrid and considers the impact of the earthquakes on population and land in southeast Missouri. Predictions for future earthquakes along the New Madrid fault, as well as instructions on preparing for and surviving a quake, are also included. Informative, clearly written, and well illustrated, On Shaky Ground will be of interest to all general readers, especially those interested in earthquakes or Missouri history.

The New Madrid Earthquakes

Author: James L. Penick
Editor: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 9780826203441
File Size: 23,47 MB
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Previously published as: The New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-1812.

The New Madrid Earthquake

Author: Myron L. Fuller
Editor: Care Publications
ISBN: 9780934426497
File Size: 34,45 MB
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This is an unabridged reprint of the first book and first thorough scientific work ever published on the great New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12. The winter of 1811-12 experienced the greatest burst of seismic energy in the history of the original 48 states. Geologist, Myron Fuller, spent several years in the field between 1900-1905 scouting the New Madrid fault zone on foot and on horseback, mapping the consequences of these giant cataclysms that had so permanently and so profoundly changed the landscape of this region 90 years before. Originally published by the U.S. Geological Survey, this book is the starting point for all serious researchers on these world-class temblors. Foreword to this 1995 printing is by seismologist, David Stewart, Ph.D.

New Madrid Earthquake

Author: Bobby Akart
Editor: Independently Published
ISBN:
File Size: 54,48 MB
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In the not too distant past, along the Mississippi River, North America tried to tear itself in half. It failed. It won't the second time. New Madrid. A standalone disaster thriller from international bestselling author, Bobby Akart, one of America's favorite storytellers, who has delivered up-all-night thrillers to readers in 245 countries and territories worldwide. "Akart is a master of suspense, keeping us on the edge of our seats. But, he does it with fact-based fiction that would scare even the most hardened readers." Two hundred years ago, several faults within the New Madrid seismic zone along the Mississippi River ruptured triggering some of the largest earthquakes in American history. The three massive quakes ripped open America's Heartland, shaking residents as far away as New York City and Washington, DC while ringing church bells in Boston and Charleston, South Carolina. "No one can research like Bobby Akart and then turn this meticulous research into one exciting thrill ride." Akart's standalone novel, New Madrid, is based on actual events. It just hasn't happened yet, until now. 200 years later after the historic quake sequence of 1811-12, it's reawakened. "This is a story of fortitude and love for family - do you have what it takes to survive and make it back to your loved ones." The New Madrid fault zone, six times larger than the San Andreas in California, has generated a series of massive earthquakes thrusting the Atwood and Chandler families in a fight to survive. Attorney Jack Atwood and his brother-in-law Tony Chandler are winding up their year-end tax planning presentation atop The Met, a skyscraper in St. Louis, before returning to Memphis for their family's Christmas celebration. Jill Atwood, her daughter Emily and teenage son Tate, are in a downtown Memphis performing arts theater attending the dress rehearsal for Emily's Christmas pageant. Beth Chandler, 28 weeks pregnant, together with her 3-year old autistic son, are traveling from Louisiana to join the rest of the family in Memphis. Will they arrive for Christmas? Will they arrive at all? Their lives are about to change forever. "You are there. Feeling what they feel. Anger, joy, love, mourning. You feel it all. Not everyone can write a book like this. It takes a special writer to make you feel a book." Bobby Akart has delivered intense, up-all-night thrillers causing you to whisper just one more chapter until the end.

The Lost History Of The New Madrid Earthquakes

Author: Conevery Bolton Valencius
Editor: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022605392X
File Size: 40,71 MB
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From December 1811 to February 1812, massive earthquakes shook the middle Mississippi Valley, collapsing homes, snapping large trees midtrunk, and briefly but dramatically reversing the flow of the continent’s mightiest river. For decades, people puzzled over the causes of the quakes, but by the time the nation began to recover from the Civil War, the New Madrid earthquakes had been essentially forgotten. In The Lost History of the New Madrid Earthquakes, Conevery Bolton Valencius remembers this major environmental disaster, demonstrating how events that have been long forgotten, even denied and ridiculed as tall tales, were in fact enormously important at the time of their occurrence, and continue to affect us today. Valencius weaves together scientific and historical evidence to demonstrate the vast role the New Madrid earthquakes played in the United States in the early nineteenth century, shaping the settlement patterns of early western Cherokees and other Indians, heightening the credibility of Tecumseh and Tenskwatawa for their Indian League in the War of 1812, giving force to frontier religious revival, and spreading scientific inquiry. Moving into the present, Valencius explores the intertwined reasons—environmental, scientific, social, and economic—why something as consequential as major earthquakes can be lost from public knowledge, offering a cautionary tale in a world struggling to respond to global climate change amid widespread willful denial. Engagingly written and ambitiously researched—both in the scientific literature and the writings of the time—The Lost History of the New Madrid Earthquakes will be an important resource in environmental history, geology, and seismology, as well as history of science and medicine and early American and Native American history.

The New Madrid Fault Finders Guide

Author: Ray Knox
Editor: Care Publications
ISBN: 9780934426428
File Size: 70,74 MB
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The most active earthquake zone in North America, outside of the West Coast, lies along the Mississippi-Ohio River Valleys between Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky, Illinois, and Indiana. Even now, more than 300 little earthquakes occur there every year--some felt, most only recorded on seismographs, and an occasional tremor that causes damage. This seismic zone is known as "The New Madrid Fault." The actual fault zone stretches from Marked tree, Arkansas, to Evansville, Indiana, but actually extends through Indiana, Ohio, Lake Ontario, and northeastward up the St. Lawrence Seaway. The most active portion of the New Madrid Fault is named for a town in Missouri that was obliterated by the earthquakes of 1811-12. It is a zone about 50 miles wide and 150 miles long within which more than 2,000 earthquakes occurred between December 16, 1811, and May 25, 1812. The New Madrid Earthquakes of 1811-12 were the greatest burst of seismic energy released in the history of the United States. Felt throughout all of the States east of the Rocky Mountains, these cataclysms damaged wine vats in Virginia, rang church bells in Boston, rattled dishes and windows in Quebec, Canada, and were felt from Cuba to Mexico. The region surrounding New Madrid in southeast Missouri was devastated. People were swallowed alive while houses, barns and silos sank into the ground. Rivers changed their courses and 12 new lakes were formed, two of which are still present to this day. Five whole towns disappeared while thousands of Native Americans were drowned in their villages as the land sank and river banks caved in The earthquakes destroyed the landscape, itself, leaving permanent scars in the fields and hills still visible today, 200 years after the shaking stopped. Streams were rerouted, lakes and swamps were formed, huge crevasses opened, landslides rolled down hillsides, huge craters were formed as groundwater and air exploded from beneath, while vast areas turned into quicksand during the shaking while tons of sand and water boiled to the surface. Hundreds of these earthquake features are still visible in the landscape today. This book is a set of seven field trips you can take to experience the turbulence of the land of that tumultuous time. The book contains a geologic history of the area along with many photographs, plus maps and detailed road logs of each trip. Each trip includes commentary by the authors, Dr. Ray Knox,and Dr. David Stewart, who are your personal field guides on the tours. The book, itself, provides a vicarious visit to the area even if you never get to physically be there. For those who take the actual tours, by a visit to the New Madrid Historical Museum you may obtain signatures validating your travels. This earns you an impressive certificate validating your status as a "Certified Fault Finder." If you are really fortunate, you may even experience a mild shake during your visit. There has never been a natural cataclysm in North America like the New Madrid Earthquakes of 1811-12. Through this book you will see where the Mississippi River ran backwards and where, for a time, the land surface rippled like the waves of an ocean, changing the face of the earth forever.

The New Madrid Earthquake

Author: Myron L. Fuller
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 58,75 MB
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Some Happenings Of The New Madrid Earthquake 1811 1812

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File Size: 48,72 MB
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When The Mississippi Ran Backwards

Author: Jay Feldman
Editor: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781416583103
File Size: 19,52 MB
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From Jay Feldmen comes an enlightening work about how the most powerful earthquakes in the history of America united the Indians in one last desperate rebellion, reversed the Mississippi River, revealed a seamy murder in the Jefferson family, and altered the course of the War of 1812. On December 15, 1811, two of Thomas Jefferson's nephews murdered a slave in cold blood and put his body parts into a roaring fire. The evidence would have been destroyed but for a rare act of God—or, as some believed, of the Indian chief Tecumseh. That same day, the Mississippi River's first steamboat, piloted by Nicholas Roosevelt, powered itself toward New Orleans on its maiden voyage. The sky grew hazy and red, and jolts of electricity flashed in the air. A prophecy by Tecumseh was about to be fulfilled. He had warned reluctant warrior-tribes that he would stamp his feet and bring down their houses. Sure enough, between December 16, 1811, and late April 1812, a catastrophic series of earthquakes shook the Mississippi River Valley. Of the more than 2,000 tremors that rumbled across the land during this time, three would have measured nearly or greater than 8.0 on the not-yet-devised Richter Scale. Centered in what is now the bootheel region of Missouri, the New Madrid earthquakes were felt as far away as Canada; New York; New Orleans; Washington, DC; and the western part of the Missouri River. A million and a half square miles were affected as the earth's surface remained in a state of constant motion for nearly four months. Towns were destroyed, an eighteen-mile-long by five-mile-wide lake was created, and even the Mississippi River temporarily ran backwards. The quakes uncovered Jefferson's nephews' cruelty and changed the course of the War of 1812 as well as the future of the new republic. In When the Mississippi Ran Backwards, Jay Feldman expertly weaves together the story of the slave murder, the steamboat, Tecumseh, and the war, and brings a forgotten period back to vivid life. Tecumseh's widely believed prophecy, seemingly fulfilled, hastened an unprecedented alliance among southern and northern tribes, who joined the British in a disastrous fight against the U.S. government. By the end of the war, the continental United States was secure against Britain, France, and Spain; the Indians had lost many lives and much land; and Jefferson's nephews were exposed as murderers. The steamboat, which survived the earthquake, was sunk. When the Mississippi Ran Backwards sheds light on this now-obscure yet pivotal period between the Revolutionary and Civil wars, uncovering the era's dramatic geophysical, political, and military upheavals. Feldman paints a vivid picture of how these powerful earthquakes made an impact on every aspect of frontier life—and why similar catastrophic quakes are guaranteed to recur. When the Mississippi Ran Backwards is popular history at its best.

The New Madrid Earthquake

Author: Arthur Clay Magill
Editor:
ISBN: 9780898752106
File Size: 26,35 MB
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The New Madrid Earthquake was among the great earthquakes of known history, affecting the topography more than any other earthquake on the North American continent. Judging from their effects, they were of a magnitude of 8.0 or higher on the Richter Scale. They were felt over the entire United States outside of the Pacific coast. Large areas sank into the earth, new lakes were formed, the course of the Mississippi River was changed, and forests were destroyed over an area of 150,000 acres. Many houses at New Madrid were thrown down. "Houses, gardens, and fields were swallowed up" one source notes. But fatalities and damage were low, because the area was sparsely settled then. Survivors reported that the earthquake caused cracks to open in the earth?s surface, the ground to roll invisible waves, and large areas of land to sink or rise. The crew of the New Orleans (the first steamboat on the Mississippi, which was on her maiden voyage) reported mooring to an island only to awake in the morning and find that he island had disappeared below the waters of the Mississippi River. Damage was reported as far away as Charleston, South Carolina, and Washington, D.C. Scientists estimate that the probability of a magnitude 6 to 7 earthquake occurring in this seismic zone within the next 50 years is higher than 90%. Such an earthquake could hit the Mississippi Valley at any time

2027 New Madrid Missouri

Author: Arlington Nuetzel
Editor: Arlington Nuetzel
ISBN: 1424193001
File Size: 27,91 MB
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Eight years after the Louisiana Purchase, the western frontier of the United States extended only to the Mississippi River. There, in the soggy, inhospitable Delta of todays Missouri Bootheel, hardscrabble pioneers suddenly found themselves fighting for their lives against horrendous odds. The Great New Madrid Earthquakes of 181112 left death and unimaginable destruction in their wake. Nuetzel chronicles the terror witnessed through the eyes of panicked victims as he recounts Vade Boncoeurs struggle for his familys survival. But could it happen today? Nuetzel firmly believes that it will, and he guides us through the sobering and shocking consequences of a twenty-first century Armageddon.

The New Madrid Earthquake

Author: Garland Carr Broadhead
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 37,71 MB
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The Next New Madrid Earthquake

Author: William Atkinson
Editor: SIU Press
ISBN: 9780809313204
File Size: 63,30 MB
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Scientists who specialize in the study of Mississippi Valley earthquakes say that the region is overdue for a powerful tremor that will cause major damage and undoubtedly some casualties. The inevitability of a future quake and the lack of preparation by both individuals and communities provided the impetus for this book. Atkinson brings together applicable information from many disciplines: history, geology and seismology, engineering, zoology, politics and community planning, economics, environmental science, sociology, and psychology and mental health to provide the most comprehensive perspective to date of the myriad impacts of a major earthquake on the Mississippi Valley. Atkinson addresses such basic questions as "What, actually, are earthquakes? How do they occur? Where are they likely to occur? Can they be predicted, perhaps even prevented?" He also addresses those steps that individuals can take to improve their chances for survival both during and after an earthquake.

The New Madrid Quake Chronicles

Author: Claude Walker
Editor: iUniverse
ISBN: 1462070361
File Size: 25,74 MB
Format: PDF
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In December 1811, a series of quakes rocked the area near New Madrid, Missouri, a settlement on the Mississippi River. Sparsely populated by French fur-traders, a dwindling number of Native Americans and newly-arrived European immigrants, the region rumbled for weeks. Rivers ran backwards. Gaseous crevasses in the earth gaped, swallowing people and buildings. While "The New Madrid Quake Chronicles" is a story of a natural calamity, it is also a parable about the imprint a disaster can leave on any family for generations. The reader meets survivors of the Great Quake from two great families headed by Shawnee leader Blue Turtle and German exile Blas Baur, whose descendents share special quake-sensing abilities. Their stories are lyrically told: mighty rivers meeting, mightier tectonic plates clashing. Historical fiction, family saga and military-political history with a touch of seismic sci-fi, "The New Madrid Quake Chronicles" is a cautionary tale. If an 1811-sized quake hit New Madrid today, an estimated 3,500 residents would die. It would leave 730,000 homeless and 2.6 million without power. Most bridges over the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers would fall. Experts agree that a “big one” will likely strike again in the New Madrid Seismic Zone; how prepared will we be?

Lost In The Annals

Author: Myrl Rhine Mueller
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 80,73 MB
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The Earthquake That Never Went Away

Author: David Stewart
Editor: Care Publications
ISBN: 9780934426541
File Size: 27,26 MB
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150 original photos, figures & tables on the New Madrid Seismic Zone of faults, fissures, & scars in the landscape still visible from the great earthquakes of 1811-12 and how they still affect you today.

The New Madrid Earthquake At Mammoth Cave 1811 1812

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Tecumseh S Prophecy

Author: Robert Morrison Hamilton
Editor:
ISBN:
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The Great New Madrid Earthquake

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ISBN:
File Size: 59,75 MB
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Compendium of information about the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12 and the potential for future earthquakes in the Mississippi River region. Includes historical accounts, current seismic data, maps, photographs.

Disaster Deferred

Author: Seth Stein
Editor: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023115139X
File Size: 30,75 MB
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Coinciding with the 200th anniversary of the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12, Disaster Deferred revisits these earthquakes, the legends that have grown around them, and the predictions of doom that have followed in their wake. Seth Stein clearly explains the techniques seismologists use to study Midwestern quakes and estimate their danger.