Liberal Peace Transitions

Author: Oliver P Richmond
Editor: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748687963
File Size: 16,74 MB
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A critical assessment of current liberal approaches to post-conflict statebuilding with constructive suggestions as to where improvements might be made. Newly available in paperback.

Post Liberal Peace Transitions

Author: Oliver P. Richmond
Editor: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 1474402186
File Size: 46,83 MB
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Why is it that states emerging from intervention, peacebuilding and statebuilding over the last 25 years appear to be 'failed by design'? This study explores the interplay of local peace agency with the (neo)liberal peacebuilding project. And it looks at how far can local 'peace formation' dynamics can go to counteract the forces of violence and play a role in rebuilding the state, consolidate peace processes and induce a more progressive form of politics. By looking at local agency related to peace formation, Oliver Richmond and Sandra Pogodda find answers to the pressing question of how large-scale peacebuilding or statebuilding may be significantly improved and made more representative of the lives, needs, rights, and ambitions of its subjects.

A Post Liberal Peace

Author: Oliver Richmond
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1136680829
File Size: 23,99 MB
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This book examines how the liberal peace experiment of the post-Cold War environment has failed to connect with its target populations, which have instead set about transforming it according to their own local requirements. Liberal peacebuilding has caused a range of unintended consequences. These emerge from the liberal peace’s internal contradictions, from its claim to offer a universal normative and epistemological basis for peace, and to offer a technology and process which can be applied to achieve it. When viewed from a range of contextual and local perspectives, these top-down and distant processes often appear to represent power rather than humanitarianism or emancipation. Yet, the liberal peace also offers a civil peace and emancipation. These tensions enable a range of hitherto little understood local and contextual peacebuilding agencies to emerge, which renegotiate both the local context and the liberal peace framework, leading to a local-liberal hybrid form of peace. This might be called a post-liberal peace. Such processes are examined in this book in a range of different cases of peacebuilding and statebuilding since the end of the Cold War. This book will be of interest to students of peacebuilding, peacekeeping, peace and conflict studies, international organisations and IR/Security Studies.

Post Liberal Peace Transitions

Author: Richmond Oliver P. Richmond
Editor: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 147440507X
File Size: 76,89 MB
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Why is it that states emerging from intervention, peacebuilding and statebuilding over the last 25 years appear to be 'failed by design'? This study explores the interplay of local peace agency with the (neo)liberal peacebuilding project. And it looks at how far can local 'peace formation' dynamics can go to counteract the forces of violence and play a role in rebuilding the state, consolidate peace processes and induce a more progressive form of politics. By looking at local agency related to peace formation, Oliver Richmond and Sandra Pogodda find answers to the pressing question of how large-scale peacebuilding or statebuilding may be significantly improved and made more representative of the lives, needs, rights, and ambitions of its subjects.

Peace In Political Unsettlement

Author: Jan Pospisil
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 3030043185
File Size: 75,67 MB
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International peacebuilding has reached an impasse. Its lofty ambitions have resulted in at best middling success, punctuated by moments of outright failure. The discrediting of the term ‘liberal peacebuilding’ has seen it evolve to respond to the numerous critiques. Notions such as ‘inclusive peace’ merge the liberal paradigm with critical notions of context, and the need to refine practices to take account of ‘the local’ or ‘complexity’. However, how this would translate into clear guidance for the practice of peacebuilding is unclear. Paradoxically, contemporary peacebuilding policy has reached an unprecedented level of vagueness. Peace in political unsettlement provides an alternative response rooted in a new discourse, which aims to speak both to the experience of working in peace process settings. It maps a new understanding of peace processes as institutionalising formalised political unsettlement and points out new ways of engaging with it. The book points to the ways in which peace processes institutionalise forms of disagreement, creating ongoing processes to manage it, rather than resolve it. It suggests a modest approach of providing ‘hooks’ to future processes, maximising the use of creative non-solutions, and practices of disrelation, are discussed as pathways for pragmatic post-war transitions. It is only by understanding the nature and techniques of formalised political unsettlement that new constructive ways of engaging with it can be found.

Transformative Transitional Justice And The Malleability Of Post Conflict States

Author: Padraig McAuliffe
Editor: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1783470046
File Size: 56,22 MB
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Despite the growing focus on issues of socio-economic transformation in contemporary transitional justice, the path dependencies imposed by the political economy of war-to-peace transitions and the limitations imposed by weak statehood are seldom considered. This book explores transitional justice’s prospects for seeking economic justice and reform of structures of poverty in the specific context of post-conflict states.

Peacebuilding And Post War Transitions

Author: Lisa Gross
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1315455757
File Size: 27,28 MB
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This book asks how, and under what conditions, external-domestic interactions impact on peacebuilding outcomes during transitions to peace and democracy. Why do so many peacebuilding interventions in post-war states result in stalled transitions despite heavy international support? This book suggests a new interaction-based explanation for this puzzle and proposes an ‘analytical framework of peacebuilding interactions’. Based on eight cases of peacebuilding interactions, it demonstrates that the limited rationality of the actors involved in external-domestic interactions influenced the post-war transition results in Kosovo. Drawing on interviews and focus groups, the insights build on the process tracing of peacebuilding reforms in the area of Local Governance and Police Reform, with a specific focus at the local level. Through an in-depth analysis of peacebuilding negotiations, this book shows how peacebuilders’ use of ad hoc interaction tactics – intended as heuristics to simplify decision-making in overly complex post-war environments – have the unintended effect of offering domestic actors additional leeway to prioritise their domestic agenda, often at the expense of achieving full democratisation. The resulting consequences of these actions mean that, even in highly resourced interventions, such as those implemented in Kosovo, stalled transitions become one of the most likely outcome of the peacebuilding process. This book will be of much interest to students of peacebuilding, war and conflict studies, European politics, security studies and IR in general.

A Post Liberal Peace

Author: Oliver P. Richmond
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 0415667828
File Size: 55,67 MB
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This book examines how the liberal peace experiment of the post-Cold War environment has failed to connect with its target populations, which have instead set about transforming it according to their own local requirements. Liberal peacebuilding has caused a range of unintended consequences. These emerge from the liberal peaceâe(tm)s internal contradictions, from its claim to offer a universal normative and epistemological basis for peace, and to offer a technology and process which can be applied to achieve it. When viewed from a range of contextual and local perspectives, these top-down and distant processes often appear to represent power rather than humanitarianism or emancipation. Yet, the liberal peace also offers a civil peace and emancipation. These tensions enable a range of hitherto little understood local and contextual peacebuilding agencies to emerge, which renegotiate both the local context and the liberal peace framework, leading to a local-liberal hybrid form of peace. This might be called a post-liberal peace. Such processes are examined in this book in a range of different cases of peacebuilding and statebuilding since the end of the Cold War. This book will be of interest to students of peacebuilding, peacekeeping, peace and conflict studies, international organisations and IR/Security Studies.

Rethinking The Liberal Peace

Author: Shahrbanou Tadjbakhsh
Editor: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1136740473
File Size: 77,41 MB
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This book presents a critical analysis of the liberal peace project and offers possible alternatives and models.

Liberal Peacebuilding And The Locus Of Legitimacy

Author: David Roberts
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317625773
File Size: 49,80 MB
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Liberal peacebuilding too often builds neither peace nor Liberalism. In a growing number of cases, people aren’t rejecting and relegating democracy because it’s bad; they’re challenging it because it isn’t relevant to their priorities and needs. The peacebuilding ‘moment’ – when consent for intervention is present and the opportunity to build a sustainable social contract between peacebuilders and people is most fruitful – is being squandered. This relationship, between governed and governance, relies on mutual needs realization, but there is no formal or informal requirement and mechanism for ascertaining what the ‘subjects’ of peacebuilding might prioritize. Instead, peacebuilders give the ‘subjects’ of peacebuilding what they think they should have. This legitimacy gap – between what peacebuilders give and what subjects want - is the subject of this book. Through a range of empirical case studies conducted by country specialists, the book reveals that, when asked, people often prioritize roads, electricity, jobs, housing, schooling and pertinent justice (amongst other things) in the immediate aftermath of war. We find that mapping this locus of legitimacy may help develop the kind of relationship upon which the sustainability of any social contract between governed and governance rests. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding.

Liberal Peace And Post Conflict Peacebuilding In Africa

Author: Patrick Tom
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137572914
File Size: 11,27 MB
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The book makes theoretical and empirical contributions to recent debates on hybrid forms of peace and ‘post-liberal’ peace. In applying concepts of power, hybridity and resistance, and providing different kinds of hybridity and resistance to explore post-conflict peacebuilding in Sierra Leone, the author makes an original contribution to existing literature by providing various ways in which power can be exercised not just between locals and internationals, but also among locals themselves and the nature of peace that is produced. This volume provides various ways in which hybridity and resistance can be manifested. A more rigorous development of these concepts not only offers a better understanding of the nature of these concepts, but also helps us to distinguish forms of hybridity and resistance that are emancipatory or transformatory from those that result in people accommodating themselves to their situation. This book is an invaluable resource for scholars and students of peacebuilding, peace and conflict studies, International Relations and African Studies, and practitioners of peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction.

From Mediation To Nation Building

Author: Joseph R. Rudolph, Jr.
Editor: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739176951
File Size: 16,55 MB
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Although there are numerous specialized works that treat the individual options, and several volumes explore the utility of these efforts in a single case study, there is currently no equivalent, recent work that treats under one cover the various third party options for influencing and managing the diverse forms of ethnic conflict.

The Political Economy Of Transitions To Peace

Author: Galia Press-Barnathan
Editor: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822973588
File Size: 58,13 MB
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Much attention has focused on the ongoing role of economics in the prevention of armed conflict and the deterioration of relations. In The Political Economy of Transitions to Peace, Galia Press-Barnathan focuses on the importance of economics in initiating and sustaining peaceful relations after conflict. Press-Barnathan provides in-depth case studies of several key relationships in the post-World War II era: Israel and Egypt; Israel and Jordan; Japan, the Philippines, and Indonesia; Japan and South Korea; Germany and France; and Germany and Poland. She creates an analytical framework through which to view each of these cases based on three factors: the domestic balance between winners and losers from transition to peace; the economic disparity between former enemies; and the impact of third parties on stimulating new cooperative economic initiatives. Her approach provides both a regional and cross-regional comparative analysis of the degree of success in maintaining and advancing peace, of the challenges faced by many nations in negotiating peace after conflict, and of the unique role of economic factors in this highly political process. Press-Barnathan employs both liberal and realist theory to examine the motivations of these states and the societies they represent. She also weighs their power relations to see how these factor into economic interdependence and the peace process. She reveals the predominant role of the state and big business in the initial transition phase ("cold" peace), but also identifies an equally vital need for a subsequent broader societal coalition in the second, normalizing phase ("warm" peace). Both levels of engagement, Press-Barnathan argues, are essential to a durable peace. Finally, she points to the complex role that third parties can play in these transitions, and the limited long-term impact of direct economic side-payments to the parties.

The Routledge History Of World Peace Since 1750

Author: Christian Philip Peterson
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1351653342
File Size: 41,97 MB
Format: PDF
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The Routledge History of World Peace since 1750 examines the varied and multifaceted scholarship surrounding the topic of peace and engages in a fruitful dialogue about the global history of peace since 1750. Interdisciplinary in nature, the book includes contributions from authors working in fields as diverse as history, philosophy, literature, art, sociology, and Peace Studies. The book crosses the divide between historical inquiry and Peace Studies scholarship, with traditional aspects of peace promotion sitting alongside expansive analyses of peace through other lenses, including specific regional investigations of the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and other parts of the world. Divided thematically into six parts that are loosely chronological in structure, the book offers a broad overview of peace issues such as peacebuilding, state building, and/or conflict resolution in individual countries or regions, and indicates the unique challenges of achieving peace from a range of perspectives. Global in scope and supported by regional and temporal case studies, the volume is an essential resource for educators, activists, and policymakers involved in promoting peace and curbing violence as well as students and scholars of Peace Studies, history, and their related fields.

Politics In The Shadow Of The Gun

Author: Katrin Wittig
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 80,83 MB
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Since the end of the Cold War, the transformation of rebel groups into political parties has become one way of integrating former armed movements into liberal war-to-peace transitions. In contrast, before the fall of the Iron Curtain, rebel groups were predominately militarily marginalized and politically excluded. From Kosovo to Nepal, and from El Salvador to Burundi, the last two decades have seen a rise in the number of cases, in which the integration of rebel groups into 'post-conflict' party politics has been actively promoted by national, regional and international policy-makers. This has led to an emerging scholarship on rebel-to-party transformations. The large majority of existing studies are constructed around strict conceptual distinctions between war and peace, as well as between rebel group and political party. They fail to capture the ambiguities, which often underpin political transition processes. In conflict-affected countries, we often witness the emergence of settings that can be qualified as neither a state of outright war, nor as a clear stage of peace. Instead, we observe politico-military organizations that frequently alternate between social protest, rebellion, violence, and party politics. In this dissertation, I develop a conceptual and theoretical critique of the existing literature on 'rebel-to-party transformations'. Primo, I draw on the "no peace, no war" and "armed politics" paradigms to deconstruct and interrogate common categories, such as war and peace, rebel group and political party, violence and democracy, in order to study the ambivalences between these different categories. Drawing on the concept of "hybridity", I propose to conceptualize rebel groups and their political party successors as "hybrid politico-military movements" in order to study the inter-linkages between politics and violence throughout the historical trajectories of these organizations. I argue that we need to take hybrid political and armed orders seriously if we want to understand party politics in the aftermath of civil war. Secundo, I appeal to historical institutionalism to propose a novel theoretical framework for understanding the trajectories of rebel political parties. Historical institutionalism brings time back into the study of rebel-to-party transformations. It is an excellent analytical approach to remedy predominant, ahistorical accounts. I specifically draw on "systemic historical process analysis" to map out rebel political parties' ideational, power and institutional politics during and beyond civil war. This dissertation analyzes the ambiguities of 'rebel-to-party transformation' processes through an in-depth qualitative case study of Burundi. Drawing on a paired comparison, I analyze the historical trajectories of the PALIPEHUTU-FNL and the CNDD-FDD in Burundi. Long cited as a major "success story" of international liberal peacebuilding among policy-makers, diplomats and academics alike, Burundi has increasingly witnessed a return to authoritarian practices. Burundi watchers have repeatedly warned of the risk of renewed civil war, especially in the aftermath of the 2015 electoral crisis. This makes Burundi an excellent case for the study of "neither-peace-nor-war" and "armed politics" settings, and their implications for rebel-to-party transformation scholarship.

Peacebuilding Paradigms

Author: Henry Carey
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108483720
File Size: 45,56 MB
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Peacebuilding is explained by combining interpretive frameworks (paradigms) that have evolved from the subfields of international relations and comparative politics.

Hybrid Forms Of Peace

Author: Oliver P. Richmond
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 0230354238
File Size: 10,74 MB
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This book examines the role of everyday action in accepting, resisting and reshaping interventions, and the unique forms of peace that emerge from the interactions between local and international actors. Building on critiques of liberal peace-building, it redefines critical peace and conflict studies, based on new research from 16 countries.

When War Ends

Author: David J. Francis
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1134763379
File Size: 36,29 MB
Format: PDF
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This volume critically examines what happens when war formally ends, the difficult and complex challenges and opportunities for winning the peace and reconciling divided communities. By reviewing a case study of the West African state of Sierra Leone, potential lessons for other parts of the world can be gained. Sierra Leone has emerged as a 'successful' model of liberal peacebuilding that is now popularly advertised and promoted by the international community as a powerful example of a country that they finally got right. Concerns about how successful a model Sierra Leone actually is, are outlined in this project. As such this volume: -

Peacebuilding And Post War Transitions

Author: Lisa Gross
Editor: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1315455765
File Size: 79,30 MB
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This book asks how, and under what conditions, external-domestic interactions impact on peacebuilding outcomes during transitions to peace and democracy. Why do so many peacebuilding interventions in post-war states result in stalled transitions despite heavy international support? This book suggests a new interaction-based explanation for this puzzle and proposes an ‘analytical framework of peacebuilding interactions’. Based on eight cases of peacebuilding interactions, it demonstrates that the limited rationality of the actors involved in external-domestic interactions influenced the post-war transition results in Kosovo. Drawing on interviews and focus groups, the insights build on the process tracing of peacebuilding reforms in the area of Local Governance and Police Reform, with a specific focus at the local level. Through an in-depth analysis of peacebuilding negotiations, this book shows how peacebuilders’ use of ad hoc interaction tactics – intended as heuristics to simplify decision-making in overly complex post-war environments – have the unintended effect of offering domestic actors additional leeway to prioritise their domestic agenda, often at the expense of achieving full democratisation. The resulting consequences of these actions mean that, even in highly resourced interventions, such as those implemented in Kosovo, stalled transitions become one of the most likely outcome of the peacebuilding process. This book will be of much interest to students of peacebuilding, war and conflict studies, European politics, security studies and IR in general.

Peace Figuration After International Intervention

Author: Gëzim Visoka
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317382765
File Size: 16,37 MB
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This book examines the adverse impacts of liberal peacebuilding in conflict-affected societies. It introduces ‘peace figuration’ as a new analytical framework for studying the intentionality, performativity, and consequences of liberal peacebuilding. The work challenges current theories and views and searches for alternative non-conflicted research avenues that are suitable for understanding how peacebuilding intentions are made, how different events shape peace outcomes, and what are the consequences of peacebuilding interventions. Drawing on detailed case studies of peacebuilding in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and Timor-Leste, the book argues that attempts to build peace often fail to achieve the intended outcomes. A figurational view of peacebuilding interventions shows that post-conflict societies experience multiple episodes of success and failure in an unpredictable trajectory. This book develops a relational sociology of peacebuilding impact, which is crucial for overcoming static measurement of peacebuilding successes or failures. It shows that international interventions can shape peace but, importantly, not always in the shape they intended. This book will be of much interest to students of statebuilding, peacebuilding, war and conflict studies, security studies and IR.