Leaders Of The Oglala Sioux

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781981893539
File Size: 56,23 MB
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*Includes pictures of Red Cloud, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Oglala oral legends, including the origins of the names Red Cloud and Crazy Horse. *Explains Red Cloud's War, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and their roles in both. "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse "Look at me - I am poor and naked, but I am the chief of the nation. We do not want riches, but we want to train our children right. Riches will do us no good. We could not take them with us to the other world. We do not want riches. We want peace and love." - Red Cloud Among the Oglala Lakota, one of the most famous bands of the Native American Tribe known as the Sioux, the longest and most effective leader was Makhpiyaluta, better known as Red Cloud. Though he has not been remembered as vividly as another member of the Oglala Lakota, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud led the group for 40 years, in war, in peace, and on a reservation, becoming so esteemed and influential that Americans began to mistakenly take him for the leader of the entire Sioux tribe. In the 1860s, Red Cloud was at the forefront of skirmishing among whites and Native Americans along the frontier in Wyoming and Montana, which came to be known as Red Cloud's War. After that, however, Red Cloud continued to lead his people to reservations first near the Black Hills and later westward after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Though he was respected as a war chief, it was his political functions as a spokesman of the Oglala that truly allowed Red Cloud to leave his mark over the last several decades of his life. Whereas Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse suffered premature deaths, Red Cloud outlived the other important leaders of the Sioux until dying in 1909 at 87 years old. Near the end of his life, he reportedly said, "They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one -- they promised to take our land...and they took it." Red Cloud is often referred to as a symbol of Lakota concession. Sitting Bull is considered symbolic of Lakota spirituality. Crazy Horse, because he delayed surrender and never entered into treaty agreements with the U.S. military, became a symbol of Lakota resistance. Crazy Horse may have fervently wished to avoid white settlers, but he's a Native American icon today because of the inability to do so. Like Geronimo in the Southwest and Sitting Bull on the Plains, Crazy Horse was a chief who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces during the 1860s, and he became one of the most famous Native Americans in American history because of one fateful confrontation with whites: the legendary Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Plains, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Like Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse tried to avoid surrendering for as long as he could, and both suffered a controversial death. Leaders of the Oglala Sioux looks at the two most famous leaders of the Oglala, including their roles in Red Cloud's War and at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became symbols of defiance and conciliation respectively. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Red Cloud and Crazy Horse like you never have before.

Leaders Of The Oglala Sioux The Lives And Legacies Of Crazy Horse And Red Cloud

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor:
ISBN: 9781493649853
File Size: 31,40 MB
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*Includes pictures of Red Cloud, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Oglala oral legends, including the origins of the names Red Cloud and Crazy Horse. *Explains Red Cloud's War, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and their roles in both. "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse "Look at me - I am poor and naked, but I am the chief of the nation. We do not want riches, but we want to train our children right. Riches will do us no good. We could not take them with us to the other world. We do not want riches. We want peace and love." - Red Cloud Among the Oglala Lakota, one of the most famous bands of the Native American Tribe known as the Sioux, the longest and most effective leader was Makhpiyaluta, better known as Red Cloud. Though he has not been remembered as vividly as another member of the Oglala Lakota, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud led the group for 40 years, in war, in peace, and on a reservation, becoming so esteemed and influential that Americans began to mistakenly take him for the leader of the entire Sioux tribe. In the 1860s, Red Cloud was at the forefront of skirmishing among whites and Native Americans along the frontier in Wyoming and Montana, which came to be known as Red Cloud's War. After that, however, Red Cloud continued to lead his people to reservations first near the Black Hills and later westward after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Though he was respected as a war chief, it was his political functions as a spokesman of the Oglala that truly allowed Red Cloud to leave his mark over the last several decades of his life. Whereas Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse suffered premature deaths, Red Cloud outlived the other important leaders of the Sioux until dying in 1909 at 87 years old. Near the end of his life, he reportedly said, "They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one -- they promised to take our land...and they took it." Red Cloud is often referred to as a symbol of Lakota concession. Sitting Bull is considered symbolic of Lakota spirituality. Crazy Horse, because he delayed surrender and never entered into treaty agreements with the U.S. military, became a symbol of Lakota resistance. Crazy Horse may have fervently wished to avoid white settlers, but he's a Native American icon today because of the inability to do so. Like Geronimo in the Southwest and Sitting Bull on the Plains, Crazy Horse was a chief who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces during the 1860s, and he became one of the most famous Native Americans in American history because of one fateful confrontation with whites: the legendary Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Plains, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Like Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse tried to avoid surrendering for as long as he could, and both suffered a controversial death. Leaders of the Oglala Sioux looks at the two most famous leaders of the Oglala, including their roles in Red Cloud's War and at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became symbols of defiance and conciliation respectively. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Red Cloud and Crazy Horse like you never have before.

Sioux Indian Leaders

Author: Mildred Fielder
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 16,74 MB
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Leaders Of The Sioux

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781981894079
File Size: 53,50 MB
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Read: 7979
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*Includes pictures of Sitting Bull and Red Cloud, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Lakota oral legends, including the origins of the names Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. *Explains the Battle of the Little Bighorn and their roles in it. "When I was a boy the Sioux owned the world. The sun rose and set on their land; they sent ten thousand men to battle. Where are the warriors today? Who slew them? Where are our lands? Who owns them? Is it wrong for me to love my own? Is it wicked for me because my skin is red? Because I am Sioux? Because I was born where my father lived? Because I would die for my people and my country?" - Sitting Bull "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse Like Geronimo in the Southwest during the same era, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were warriors and leaders of different groups of Lakota (Sioux) who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces across the Plains during the 1860s and 1870s. Admired by their own people for their kindness and strong leadership, reviled by their enemies for their defiance, when The Great Sioux War of 1876 began, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were two of the most important leaders among all Native American tribes on the Plains, and they were the ones to turn to for those who intended to keep fighting whites. Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were hardly the only Native Americans fighting the U.S. Army at the time, but they became legends at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors led by Crazy Horse and inspired by one of Sitting Bull's visions routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Sioux, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Crazy Horse kept fighting for a year before surrendering, and Sitting Bull defiantly refused to surrender, instead heading with a smaller band into Canada and remaining exiled. When they finally did surrender, and the threat they posed eliminated, Americans viewed the two Native Americans as celebrities. Sitting Bull even went on to appear in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show during the 1880s. However, the two Lakota leaders would be connected in one more way: death. The deaths of both Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse took place on reservations and remain controversial to this day. Though he has not been remembered as vividly as another member of the Oglala Lakota, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud led the group for 40 years, in war, in peace, and on a reservation, becoming so esteemed and influential that Americans began to mistakenly take him for the leader of the entire Sioux tribe. In the 1860s, Red Cloud was at the forefront of skirmishing among whites and Native Americans along the frontier in Wyoming and Montana, which came to be known as Red Cloud's War. After that, however, Red Cloud continued to lead his people to reservations first near the Black Hills and later westward after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Leaders of the Sioux looks at the most famous leaders of the Lakota and the victors at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became some of the most famous symbols of defiance in American history. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and Red Cloud like you never have before.

Leaders Of The Sioux The Lives And Legacies Of Sitting Bull Crazy Horse And Red Cloud

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor:
ISBN: 9781493657872
File Size: 53,16 MB
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*Includes pictures of Sitting Bull and Red Cloud, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Lakota oral legends, including the origins of the names Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. *Explains the Battle of the Little Bighorn and their roles in it. "When I was a boy the Sioux owned the world. The sun rose and set on their land; they sent ten thousand men to battle. Where are the warriors today? Who slew them? Where are our lands? Who owns them? Is it wrong for me to love my own? Is it wicked for me because my skin is red? Because I am Sioux? Because I was born where my father lived? Because I would die for my people and my country?" - Sitting Bull "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse Like Geronimo in the Southwest during the same era, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were warriors and leaders of different groups of Lakota (Sioux) who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces across the Plains during the 1860s and 1870s. Admired by their own people for their kindness and strong leadership, reviled by their enemies for their defiance, when The Great Sioux War of 1876 began, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were two of the most important leaders among all Native American tribes on the Plains, and they were the ones to turn to for those who intended to keep fighting whites. Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were hardly the only Native Americans fighting the U.S. Army at the time, but they became legends at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors led by Crazy Horse and inspired by one of Sitting Bull's visions routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Sioux, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Crazy Horse kept fighting for a year before surrendering, and Sitting Bull defiantly refused to surrender, instead heading with a smaller band into Canada and remaining exiled. When they finally did surrender, and the threat they posed eliminated, Americans viewed the two Native Americans as celebrities. Sitting Bull even went on to appear in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show during the 1880s. However, the two Lakota leaders would be connected in one more way: death. The deaths of both Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse took place on reservations and remain controversial to this day. Though he has not been remembered as vividly as another member of the Oglala Lakota, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud led the group for 40 years, in war, in peace, and on a reservation, becoming so esteemed and influential that Americans began to mistakenly take him for the leader of the entire Sioux tribe. In the 1860s, Red Cloud was at the forefront of skirmishing among whites and Native Americans along the frontier in Wyoming and Montana, which came to be known as Red Cloud's War. After that, however, Red Cloud continued to lead his people to reservations first near the Black Hills and later westward after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Leaders of the Sioux looks at the most famous leaders of the Lakota and the victors at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became some of the most famous symbols of defiance in American history. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and Red Cloud like you never have before.

Great Events 1971 1984

Author:
Editor: Salem PressInc
ISBN: 9781587650581
File Size: 70,22 MB
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Vol. 1 1900--1920, Vol. 2 1920--1939, Vol. 3 1939-1957, Vol. 4 1957--1971, Vol. 5 1971--1984, Vol. 6 1984-1993, Vol. 7 1993--1998, Vol. 8 1998-2001.

American Military Leaders A L

Author: John C. Fredriksen
Editor: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1576070018
File Size: 79,75 MB
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A comprehensive collection of biographies of the most prominent military leaders in American history. * 422 A-Z biographies highlight each individual's background, contributions, and significance to America's fortunes in war * Illustrated * Cites works for further research and includes a list of leaders organized by their military titles

The 100 Most Influential World Leaders Of All Time

Author: Amy McKenna Senior Editor, Geography and History
Editor: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
ISBN: 1615300155
File Size: 22,81 MB
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Collects profiles of the one hundred most influential leaders throughout history, including such heads of state as Constantine and Barack Obama, such religious leaders as the Dalai Lama, and such influential social leaders as Martin Luther King, Jr.

Historic World Leaders Africa Middle East Asia Pacific

Author: Anne Commire
Editor: Gale Cengage
ISBN: 9780810384095
File Size: 36,66 MB
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This is volume one in a five-volume biographical resource, which presents the lives, times and significant contributions of social, political and religious leaders from earliest recorded times to the present - both the best-known and lesser-known figures. This particular volume deals with Africa, the Middle East, Australia, and Asia.

Hearings

Author: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Public Welfare
Editor:
ISBN:
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Acta Ethnographica Hungarica

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 71,58 MB
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Red Cloud S Folk

Author: George E. Hyde
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806115207
File Size: 20,32 MB
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The westward drive of the warlike Sioux Indians along a thousand miles of prairie and woodland, from the upper reaches of the Mississippi to the lower Powder River in Montana, is one of the epic migrations of history. From about 1660 to the first quarter of the nineteenth century, the Teton Sioux swept away all opposition: Arikaras, Ponkas, Crees, Crows, Cheyennes--all fell away and dispersed as the Sioux advanced, until the invaders ranged over a vast territory in the northwest, hunting buffalo and raiding their neighbors. During the ensuing years of heavy conflict, between 1865 and 1877, Red Cloud of the Oglalas stood out as one of the greatest of the Sioux leaders. George E. Hyde was born in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1882. As a boy he became interested in Indians and began writing about them in 1910. He has produced some of the most important books on the American Indian ever written, including Indians of the High Plains, Indians of the Woodlands, Red Cloud's Folk, Spotted Tail's Folk, and Life of George Bent, all published by the University of Oklahoma Press. Hyde died in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1968 at the age of 86. Royal B. Hassrick was the author of serveral books on Indians and Indian art, including The Sioux: Customs of a Warrior Society, also published by the University of Oklahoma Press.

The Nebraska Story

Author: George Evert Condra
Editor:
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The Sioux

Author: Michelle Levine
Editor: Lerner Publications
ISBN: 9780822528647
File Size: 36,44 MB
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Describes the history, family life, and traditions of the Sioux, and provides brief portraits of famous leaders, including Crazy Horse and Charles Eastman.

Chronology Of Native North American History

Author: Duane Champagne
Editor: Detroit : Gale Research
ISBN:
File Size: 39,28 MB
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Outlines important people, places, and events in Native American history, covering such topics as art, activism, education, literature, religion, and sports

Religious Leaders Of America

Author: Julius Caesar Schwarz
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 15,17 MB
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Great Misadventures Military

Author: Peggy Saari
Editor:
ISBN: 9780787628017
File Size: 12,66 MB
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Explores over 100 historical, political, military, and social events where human error has led to disaster.

The Good Doctors

Author: John Dittmer
Editor: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1496810384
File Size: 66,12 MB
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In the summer of 1964 medical professionals, mostly white and northern, organized the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) to provide care and support for civil rights activists organizing black voters in Mississippi. They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from Freedom Summer, the March on Selma, and the Chicago Democratic Convention of 1968. Galvanized and sometimes radicalized by their firsthand view of disenfranchised communities, the MCHR soon expanded its mission to encompass a range of causes from poverty to the war in Vietnam. They later took on the whole of the United States healthcare system. MCHR doctors soon realized fighting segregation would mean not just caring for white volunteers, but also exposing and correcting shocking inequalities in segregated health care. They pioneered community health plans and brought medical care to underserved or unserved areas. Though education was the most famous battleground for integration, the appalling injustice of segregated health care levelled equally devastating consequences. Award-winning historian John Dittmer, author of the classic civil rights history Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi, has written an insightful and moving account of a group of idealists who put their careers in the service of the motto "Health Care Is a Human Right."