Crazy Horse

Author: The Edward Clown Family
Editor: Gibbs Smith
ISBN: 1423641248
File Size: 64,69 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 8144
Download

The Edward Clown family, nearest living relatives to the Lakota war leader, presents the family tales and memories told to them about their famous grandfather. In many ways the oral history differs from what has become the standard and widely accepted biography of Crazy Horse. The family clarifies the inaccuracies and shares their story about the past, including what it means to them to be Lakota, the family genealogy, the life of Crazy Horse and his motivations, his death, and why they chose to keep quiet with their knowledge for so long before finally deciding to tell the truth as they know it. This book is a compelling addition to the body of works about Crazy Horse and the complicated and often conflicting events of that time period in American History. Floyd Clown, Doug War Eagle, and Don Red Thunder are the sole administrators and spokesmen of the Crazy Horse estate and often speak at historical gatherings and national parks about their family’s history. William Matson has produced and directed an award-winning video, Sitting Bull’s Voice, as well as the two-part video series, The Authorized Biography of Sitting Bull by His Great-Grandson, and the four-part video series, The Authorized Biography of Crazy Horse and His Family. He regularly speaks about these videos and their content at film festivals and has been working with the Crazy Horse family since 2001 to tell their story.

Crazy Horse

Author: The Edward Clown Family
Editor: Gibbs Smith
ISBN: 9781423657972
File Size: 57,74 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 6677
Download

The Edward Clown family, nearest living relatives to the Lakota war leader, presents the family tales and memories told to them about their famous grandfather. This book is a compelling addition to the body of works about Crazy Horse and the complicated and often conflicting events of that time period in American History.

Crazy Horse

Author: William B. Matson
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 70,81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 5690
Download


Crazy Horse

Author: Jodyanne Benson
Editor: Cavendish Square Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 150265055X
File Size: 57,30 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 3883
Download

Crazy Horse is one of the most iconic and well-known Native Americans. This book explores his life story. Readers follow his birth in the Lakota Oglala tribe to his resistance against the American government and ultimately his death at Fort Robinson in Nebraska. Sidebars detail the socioeconomic structures of his tribe and community and his significance today. Readers will understand his legacy and view his lasting image in the Crazy Horse Memorial. Historical events are presented from the perspective of the American government, the settlers he encountered, and the Lakota he fought to protect. Through easy-to-understand language and vivid photographs, young readers will discover the man behind the legend.

Crazy Horse

Author: Kingsley M. Bray
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806139869
File Size: 60,52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 8832
Download

Crazy Horse: A Lakota Life corrects older, idealized accounts—and draws on a greater variety of sources than other recent biographies—to expose the real Crazy Horse: not the brash Sioux warrior we have come to expect but a modest, reflective man whose courage was anchored in Lakota piety. Kingsley M. Bray has plumbed interviews of Crazy Horse's contemporaries and consulted modern Lakotas to fill in vital details of Crazy Horse's inner and public life. To this day, Crazy Horse remains a compelling symbol of resistance for modern Lakotas. Crazy Horse: A Lakota Life is a singular achievement, scholarly and authoritative, offering a complete portrait of the man and a fuller understanding of his place in American Indian and United States history.

The Journey Of Crazy Horse

Author: Joseph Marshall
Editor: Viking Adult
ISBN:
File Size: 38,58 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 8725
Download

A leading Lakota historian and storyteller offers a lively portrait of Crazy Horse, the era in which he lived, and his legacy, drawing on his own culture's oral tradition and firsthand research to capture diverse aspects of Crazy Horse's life, from the visions that led him to battle to preserve the Lakota homeland to his profound leadership skills. 40,000 first printing.

Great Plains Quarterly

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 16,98 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 2488
Download


Leaders Of The Sioux

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781981894079
File Size: 49,37 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 8289
Download

*Includes pictures of Sitting Bull and Red Cloud, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Lakota oral legends, including the origins of the names Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. *Explains the Battle of the Little Bighorn and their roles in it. "When I was a boy the Sioux owned the world. The sun rose and set on their land; they sent ten thousand men to battle. Where are the warriors today? Who slew them? Where are our lands? Who owns them? Is it wrong for me to love my own? Is it wicked for me because my skin is red? Because I am Sioux? Because I was born where my father lived? Because I would die for my people and my country?" - Sitting Bull "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse Like Geronimo in the Southwest during the same era, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were warriors and leaders of different groups of Lakota (Sioux) who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces across the Plains during the 1860s and 1870s. Admired by their own people for their kindness and strong leadership, reviled by their enemies for their defiance, when The Great Sioux War of 1876 began, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were two of the most important leaders among all Native American tribes on the Plains, and they were the ones to turn to for those who intended to keep fighting whites. Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were hardly the only Native Americans fighting the U.S. Army at the time, but they became legends at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors led by Crazy Horse and inspired by one of Sitting Bull's visions routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Sioux, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Crazy Horse kept fighting for a year before surrendering, and Sitting Bull defiantly refused to surrender, instead heading with a smaller band into Canada and remaining exiled. When they finally did surrender, and the threat they posed eliminated, Americans viewed the two Native Americans as celebrities. Sitting Bull even went on to appear in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show during the 1880s. However, the two Lakota leaders would be connected in one more way: death. The deaths of both Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse took place on reservations and remain controversial to this day. Though he has not been remembered as vividly as another member of the Oglala Lakota, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud led the group for 40 years, in war, in peace, and on a reservation, becoming so esteemed and influential that Americans began to mistakenly take him for the leader of the entire Sioux tribe. In the 1860s, Red Cloud was at the forefront of skirmishing among whites and Native Americans along the frontier in Wyoming and Montana, which came to be known as Red Cloud's War. After that, however, Red Cloud continued to lead his people to reservations first near the Black Hills and later westward after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Leaders of the Sioux looks at the most famous leaders of the Lakota and the victors at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became some of the most famous symbols of defiance in American history. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and Red Cloud like you never have before.

The Victors Of The Battle Of Little Bighorn The Lives And Legacies Of Sitting Bull And Crazy Horse

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor:
ISBN: 9781493577392
File Size: 25,68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 7716
Download

*Includes pictures of Sitting Bull, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Lakota oral legends, including the origins of the names Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. *Explains the Battle of the Little Bighorn and their roles in it. "When I was a boy the Sioux owned the world. The sun rose and set on their land; they sent ten thousand men to battle. Where are the warriors today? Who slew them? Where are our lands? Who owns them? Is it wrong for me to love my own? Is it wicked for me because my skin is red? Because I am Sioux? Because I was born where my father lived? Because I would die for my people and my country?" - Sitting Bull "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse Like Geronimo in the Southwest during the same era, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were warriors and leaders of different groups of Lakota (Sioux) who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces across the Plains during the 1860s and 1870s. Admired by their own people for their kindness and strong leadership, reviled by their enemies for their defiance, when The Great Sioux War of 1876 began, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were two of the most important leaders among all Native American tribes on the Plains, and they were the ones to turn to for those who intended to keep fighting whites. Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were hardly the only Native Americans fighting the U.S. Army at the time, but they became legends at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors led by Crazy Horse and inspired by one of Sitting Bull's visions routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Sioux, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Crazy Horse kept fighting for a year before surrendering, and Sitting Bull defiantly refused to surrender, instead heading with a smaller band into Canada and remaining exiled. When they finally did surrender, and the threat they posed eliminated, Americans viewed the two Native Americans as celebrities. Sitting Bull even went on to appear in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show during the 1880s. However, the two Lakota leaders would be connected in one more way: death. The deaths of both Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse took place on reservations and remain controversial to this day. The Victors of the Battle of the Little Bighorn looks at the two most famous leaders of the Lakota and the victors at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became two of the most famous symbols of defiance in American history. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse like you never have before.

Leaders Of The Sioux The Lives And Legacies Of Sitting Bull Crazy Horse And Red Cloud

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor:
ISBN: 9781493657872
File Size: 30,64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 650
Download

*Includes pictures of Sitting Bull and Red Cloud, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Lakota oral legends, including the origins of the names Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. *Explains the Battle of the Little Bighorn and their roles in it. "When I was a boy the Sioux owned the world. The sun rose and set on their land; they sent ten thousand men to battle. Where are the warriors today? Who slew them? Where are our lands? Who owns them? Is it wrong for me to love my own? Is it wicked for me because my skin is red? Because I am Sioux? Because I was born where my father lived? Because I would die for my people and my country?" - Sitting Bull "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse Like Geronimo in the Southwest during the same era, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were warriors and leaders of different groups of Lakota (Sioux) who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces across the Plains during the 1860s and 1870s. Admired by their own people for their kindness and strong leadership, reviled by their enemies for their defiance, when The Great Sioux War of 1876 began, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were two of the most important leaders among all Native American tribes on the Plains, and they were the ones to turn to for those who intended to keep fighting whites. Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were hardly the only Native Americans fighting the U.S. Army at the time, but they became legends at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors led by Crazy Horse and inspired by one of Sitting Bull's visions routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Sioux, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Crazy Horse kept fighting for a year before surrendering, and Sitting Bull defiantly refused to surrender, instead heading with a smaller band into Canada and remaining exiled. When they finally did surrender, and the threat they posed eliminated, Americans viewed the two Native Americans as celebrities. Sitting Bull even went on to appear in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show during the 1880s. However, the two Lakota leaders would be connected in one more way: death. The deaths of both Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse took place on reservations and remain controversial to this day. Though he has not been remembered as vividly as another member of the Oglala Lakota, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud led the group for 40 years, in war, in peace, and on a reservation, becoming so esteemed and influential that Americans began to mistakenly take him for the leader of the entire Sioux tribe. In the 1860s, Red Cloud was at the forefront of skirmishing among whites and Native Americans along the frontier in Wyoming and Montana, which came to be known as Red Cloud's War. After that, however, Red Cloud continued to lead his people to reservations first near the Black Hills and later westward after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Leaders of the Sioux looks at the most famous leaders of the Lakota and the victors at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became some of the most famous symbols of defiance in American history. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and Red Cloud like you never have before.

Reference Encyclopedia Of The American Indian

Author: Barry T. Klein
Editor: Todd Publications
ISBN: 9780915344772
File Size: 78,50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 2987
Download


Leaders Of The Oglala Sioux

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781981893539
File Size: 10,11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 9968
Download

*Includes pictures of Red Cloud, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Oglala oral legends, including the origins of the names Red Cloud and Crazy Horse. *Explains Red Cloud's War, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and their roles in both. "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse "Look at me - I am poor and naked, but I am the chief of the nation. We do not want riches, but we want to train our children right. Riches will do us no good. We could not take them with us to the other world. We do not want riches. We want peace and love." - Red Cloud Among the Oglala Lakota, one of the most famous bands of the Native American Tribe known as the Sioux, the longest and most effective leader was Makhpiyaluta, better known as Red Cloud. Though he has not been remembered as vividly as another member of the Oglala Lakota, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud led the group for 40 years, in war, in peace, and on a reservation, becoming so esteemed and influential that Americans began to mistakenly take him for the leader of the entire Sioux tribe. In the 1860s, Red Cloud was at the forefront of skirmishing among whites and Native Americans along the frontier in Wyoming and Montana, which came to be known as Red Cloud's War. After that, however, Red Cloud continued to lead his people to reservations first near the Black Hills and later westward after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Though he was respected as a war chief, it was his political functions as a spokesman of the Oglala that truly allowed Red Cloud to leave his mark over the last several decades of his life. Whereas Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse suffered premature deaths, Red Cloud outlived the other important leaders of the Sioux until dying in 1909 at 87 years old. Near the end of his life, he reportedly said, "They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one -- they promised to take our land...and they took it." Red Cloud is often referred to as a symbol of Lakota concession. Sitting Bull is considered symbolic of Lakota spirituality. Crazy Horse, because he delayed surrender and never entered into treaty agreements with the U.S. military, became a symbol of Lakota resistance. Crazy Horse may have fervently wished to avoid white settlers, but he's a Native American icon today because of the inability to do so. Like Geronimo in the Southwest and Sitting Bull on the Plains, Crazy Horse was a chief who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces during the 1860s, and he became one of the most famous Native Americans in American history because of one fateful confrontation with whites: the legendary Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Plains, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Like Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse tried to avoid surrendering for as long as he could, and both suffered a controversial death. Leaders of the Oglala Sioux looks at the two most famous leaders of the Oglala, including their roles in Red Cloud's War and at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became symbols of defiance and conciliation respectively. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Red Cloud and Crazy Horse like you never have before.

South Dakota History

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 72,51 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 5838
Download


Sitting Bull

Author: Ernie LaPointe
Editor:
ISBN: 9781423605560
File Size: 29,64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 9363
Download

The only book on Sitting Bull written by a lineal descendant Ernie LaPointe is the great -grandson of the famous Hunkpapa Lakota chief, and he presents the family tales and memories told to him about his great-grandfather. In many ways the oral history differs from what has become the standard and widely accepted biography of Sitting Bull. LaPointe explains the discrepancies, how they occurred, and why he wants to tell his story of Tatanka Iyotake. Ernie LaPointe, a great-grandson of Sitting Bull, was born on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. He is a Sundancer and lives the traditional way of the Lakota and follows the rules of the sacred pipe. He lives in South Dakota.

Meeting At Little Bighorn

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781983753411
File Size: 22,87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 1320
Download

*Includes pictures of Custer, Sitting Bull, and important people, places, and events in their lives. *Explains the Lakota oral legends and the origins of the names Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. *Analyzes the three men and their legacies. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading. The Battle of the Little Bighorn is one of the most famous battles in American history and to this day remains one of the U.S. Army's biggest debacles. It was also the most decisive victory a Native American tribe had against the U.S. as it steadily pushed westward and forced native tribes off their land. The battle forever linked Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and George Custer, and it also made them American legends. Like Geronimo in the Southwest during the same era, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces across the Plains during the 1860s on the way to becoming leaders of the Lakota. While it is still debated whether Sitting Bull was the "Supreme Chief of the whole Sioux Nation" by 1868, it's clear that he was one of the influential leaders of the Lakota. And when The Great Sioux War of 1876 began, Sitting Bull was recognized as the most important leader among all Native American tribes on the Plains, and the one to turn to for those who intended to keep fighting whites. At the Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors inspired by one of Sitting Bull's visions routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by Custer, Crazy Horse was the one who executed the vision, leading his warriors against two of the 7th Cavalry columns, and oral legends claim he led the charge that started the rout of Custer's column. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Sioux, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Both Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull became celebrities of sorts after their eventual surrender, and both suffered controversial deaths on reservations that had their tribesmen claiming they were assassinated. Though he's now best remembered for "Custer's Last Stand," George Armstrong Custer began June 25, 1876 as one of America's better regarded cavalry officers, and a man whose ambitions might one day take him to higher office. In fact, decades before radio and television existed, Custer mastered the art of public relations, dressing impeccably and having newspaper correspondents accompany him on campaign, all in an effort to help cultivate and enhance his legacy. Custer's efforts worked, with one biographer noting that Americans during the 19th century viewed him as "a cavalier without fear and beyond reproach." Much like famous Confederate cavalry leader JEB Stuart, Custer added substance to the style. Despite being in his early 20s when the Civil War started, Custer rose through the ranks so quickly that he famously commanded a brigade of Michigan cavalrymen at Gettysburg, fighting the vaunted JEB Stuart and his horsemen to a standstill on the climactic 3rd day of that battle. Custer's success continued through until the end of the war, with his men playing an integral role during the Appomattox Campaign that forced the surrender of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Had Custer's career ended there, he would have been both successful and largely forgotten. Meeting at Little Bighorn details the lives of the three men and their feateful meeting at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes them and addresses the controversies surrounding their lives and their famous battle. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events in his life, you will learn about Custer, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse like you never have before, in no time at all.

Meeting At Little Bighorn

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781492906070
File Size: 55,71 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 2140
Download

*Includes pictures of Custer, Sitting Bull, and important people, places, and events in their lives. *Explains the Lakota oral legends and the origins of the names Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. *Analyzes the three men and their legacies. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading. The Battle of the Little Bighorn is one of the most famous battles in American history and to this day remains one of the U.S. Army's biggest debacles. It was also the most decisive victory a Native American tribe had against the U.S. as it steadily pushed westward and forced native tribes off their land. The battle forever linked Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and George Custer, and it also made them American legends. Like Geronimo in the Southwest during the same era, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces across the Plains during the 1860s on the way to becoming leaders of the Lakota. While it is still debated whether Sitting Bull was the "Supreme Chief of the whole Sioux Nation" by 1868, it's clear that he was one of the influential leaders of the Lakota. And when The Great Sioux War of 1876 began, Sitting Bull was recognized as the most important leader among all Native American tribes on the Plains, and the one to turn to for those who intended to keep fighting whites. At the Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors inspired by one of Sitting Bull's visions routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by Custer, Crazy Horse was the one who executed the vision, leading his warriors against two of the 7th Cavalry columns, and oral legends claim he led the charge that started the rout of Custer's column. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Sioux, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Both Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull became celebrities of sorts after their eventual surrender, and both suffered controversial deaths on reservations that had their tribesmen claiming they were assassinated. Though he's now best remembered for "Custer's Last Stand," George Armstrong Custer began June 25, 1876 as one of America's better regarded cavalry officers, and a man whose ambitions might one day take him to higher office. In fact, decades before radio and television existed, Custer mastered the art of public relations, dressing impeccably and having newspaper correspondents accompany him on campaign, all in an effort to help cultivate and enhance his legacy. Custer's efforts worked, with one biographer noting that Americans during the 19th century viewed him as "a cavalier without fear and beyond reproach." Much like famous Confederate cavalry leader JEB Stuart, Custer added substance to the style. Despite being in his early 20s when the Civil War started, Custer rose through the ranks so quickly that he famously commanded a brigade of Michigan cavalrymen at Gettysburg, fighting the vaunted JEB Stuart and his horsemen to a standstill on the climactic 3rd day of that battle. Custer's success continued through until the end of the war, with his men playing an integral role during the Appomattox Campaign that forced the surrender of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Had Custer's career ended there, he would have been both successful and largely forgotten. Meeting at Little Bighorn details the lives of the three men and their feateful meeting at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes them and addresses the controversies surrounding their lives and their famous battle. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events in his life, you will learn about Custer, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse like you never have before, in no time at all.

The Journey Of Crazy Horse

Author: Joseph M. Marshall III
Editor: Penguin
ISBN: 1440649200
File Size: 39,36 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 843
Download

Drawing on vivid oral histories, Joseph M. Marshall’s intimate biography introduces a never-before-seen portrait of Crazy Horse and his Lakota community Most of the world remembers Crazy Horse as a peerless warrior who brought the U.S. Army to its knees at the Battle of Little Bighorn. But to his fellow Lakota Indians, he was a dutiful son and humble fighting man who—with valor, spirit, respect, and unparalleled leadership—fought for his people’s land, livelihood, and honor. In this fascinating biography, Joseph M. Marshall, himself a Lakota Indian, creates a vibrant portrait of the man, his times, and his legacy. Thanks to firsthand research and his culture’s rich oral tradition (rarely shared outside the Native American community), Marshall reveals many aspects of Crazy Horse’s life, including details of the powerful vision that convinced him of his duty to help preserve the Lakota homeland—a vision that changed the course of Crazy Horse’s life and spurred him confidently into battle time and time again. The Journey of Crazy Horse is the true story of how one man’s fight for his people’s survival roused his true genius as a strategist, commander, and trusted leader. And it is an unforgettable portrayal of a revered human being and a profound celebration of a culture, a community, and an enduring way of life. "Those wishing to understand Crazy Horse as the Lakota know him won't find a better accout than Marshall's." -San Francisco Chronicle

Leaders Of The Oglala Sioux The Lives And Legacies Of Crazy Horse And Red Cloud

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Editor:
ISBN: 9781493649853
File Size: 57,85 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 4905
Download

*Includes pictures of Red Cloud, depictions of Crazy Horse, and important people and places in their lives. *Explains several Oglala oral legends, including the origins of the names Red Cloud and Crazy Horse. *Explains Red Cloud's War, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and their roles in both. "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again." - Crazy Horse "Look at me - I am poor and naked, but I am the chief of the nation. We do not want riches, but we want to train our children right. Riches will do us no good. We could not take them with us to the other world. We do not want riches. We want peace and love." - Red Cloud Among the Oglala Lakota, one of the most famous bands of the Native American Tribe known as the Sioux, the longest and most effective leader was Makhpiyaluta, better known as Red Cloud. Though he has not been remembered as vividly as another member of the Oglala Lakota, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud led the group for 40 years, in war, in peace, and on a reservation, becoming so esteemed and influential that Americans began to mistakenly take him for the leader of the entire Sioux tribe. In the 1860s, Red Cloud was at the forefront of skirmishing among whites and Native Americans along the frontier in Wyoming and Montana, which came to be known as Red Cloud's War. After that, however, Red Cloud continued to lead his people to reservations first near the Black Hills and later westward after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Though he was respected as a war chief, it was his political functions as a spokesman of the Oglala that truly allowed Red Cloud to leave his mark over the last several decades of his life. Whereas Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse suffered premature deaths, Red Cloud outlived the other important leaders of the Sioux until dying in 1909 at 87 years old. Near the end of his life, he reportedly said, "They made us many promises, more than I can remember. But they kept but one -- they promised to take our land...and they took it." Red Cloud is often referred to as a symbol of Lakota concession. Sitting Bull is considered symbolic of Lakota spirituality. Crazy Horse, because he delayed surrender and never entered into treaty agreements with the U.S. military, became a symbol of Lakota resistance. Crazy Horse may have fervently wished to avoid white settlers, but he's a Native American icon today because of the inability to do so. Like Geronimo in the Southwest and Sitting Bull on the Plains, Crazy Horse was a chief who fought in several skirmishes against settlers and U.S. forces during the 1860s, and he became one of the most famous Native Americans in American history because of one fateful confrontation with whites: the legendary Battle of the Little Bighorn, during which an estimated 2,000 Lakota and Cheyenne warriors routed and then annihilated the 7th U.S. Cavalry led by George Custer. That disaster led the American government to double down on its efforts to "pacify" the Plains, and by the end of the decade many of them had surrendered and been moved onto a reservation. Like Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse tried to avoid surrendering for as long as he could, and both suffered a controversial death. Leaders of the Oglala Sioux looks at the two most famous leaders of the Oglala, including their roles in Red Cloud's War and at Little Bighorn, but it also humanizes the men who became symbols of defiance and conciliation respectively. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Red Cloud and Crazy Horse like you never have before.

Congressional Record

Author: United States. Congress
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 62,17 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 6215
Download

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

Legacy

Author: Charles E. Rankin
Editor: Montana Historical Society
ISBN:
File Size: 33,86 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 8155
Download

Legacy provides a thorough examination of the Little Bighorn's historical significance and cultural impact from both white and Native American perspectives.