Cold War In A Cold Land

Author: David Mills
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 28,96 MB
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Cold War In A Cold Land

Author: David W. Mills
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806149388
File Size: 16,59 MB
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Most communists, as any plains state patriot would have told you in the 1950s, lived in Los Angeles or New York City, not Minot, North Dakota. The Cold War as it played out across the Great Plains was not the Cold War of the American cities and coasts. Nor was it tempered much by midwestern isolationism, as common wisdom has it. In this book, David W. Mills offers an enlightening look at what most of the heartland was up to while America was united in its war on Reds. Cold War in a Cold Land adopts a regional perspective to develop a new understanding of a critical chapter in the nation’s history. Marx himself had no hope that landholding farmers would rise up as communist revolutionaries. So it should come as no surprise that in places like South Dakota, where 70 percent of the population owned land and worked for themselves, people didn’t take the threat of internal subversion very seriously. Mills plumbs the historical record to show how residents of the plains states—while deeply patriotic and supportive of the nation’s foreign policy—responded less than enthusiastically to national anticommunist programs. Only South Dakota, for example, adopted a loyalty oath, and it was fervently opposed throughout the state. Only Montana, prodded by one state legislator, formed an investigation committee—one that never investigated anyone and was quickly disbanded. Plains state people were, however, “highly churched” and enthusiastically embraced federal attempts to use religion as a bulwark against atheistic communist ideology. Even more enthusiastic was the Great Plains response to the military buildup that accompanied Cold War politics, as the construction of airbases and missile fields brought untold economic benefits to the region. A much-needed, nuanced account of how average citizens in middle America experienced Cold War politics and policies, Cold War in a Cold Land is a significant addition to the history of both the Cold War and the Great Plains.

Cold War In A Cold Land

Author: David Walter Mills
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 26,12 MB
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The Real Cold War

Author: Chris B. Tye
Editor:
ISBN: 9780095246927
File Size: 48,77 MB
Format: PDF
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Covering The Cold War And Other Shadows In The Land Of The Midnight Sun

Author: Harry Heintzen
Editor: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 1452011729
File Size: 46,16 MB
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A young reporter wants so badly to be a foreign correspondent that he leaves his job in the U.S. And heads for Scandinavia to try his luck. He encounters a weird, white world and quickly finds himself covering the Cold War between Finland And The Soviet Union, For which he is denounced in Pravda. He finds himself writing for a journalistic giant, The New York Herald-Tribune, but which pays a pittance for his stories. He covers events in Sweden, Finland, Norway and Denmark, meeting such people as a Nobel Peace Prize winner, a Norwegian war hero, a singer/movie actress, a Prime Minister and a host of other interesting characters. He also meets and marries the girl of his dreams. Then, just as his money is about to run out, he unexpectedly wins a prestigious and lucrative journalism award that brings him back To The U. S. And recognition as a full-ledged foreign correspondent. Told in letters and rememberances, it is a story of suceeding against the odds in the Land of the Midnight Sun.

Cold War Spooks

Author: Tony Seidel
Editor: iUniverse
ISBN: 0595409024
File Size: 27,47 MB
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Three young men in their 20s experience intrigue and adventure as members of the elite U.S. Naval Security Group during the 1960s cold war. They're expertly prepared to intercept and analyze Soviet communications-but not for the dangerous missions that put them in harm's way above, on, and under the oceans of the Pacific Rim.Having just left his new bride, Jake Morton finds himself facing challenges solving communications mysteries for the Navy, and flying into danger over Soviet territory. Cold War Spooks offers a rare glimpse into clandestine intelligence-gathering as Sonny Powell becomes trapped in an American submarine, in Russian waters. Art Spencer-who thought he'd coasted into a cushy Navy desk job in Hawaii, boards a clandestine freighter plying the former atomic test sites in the South Pacific in pursuit of a mysterious Russian submarine far from its home.Lives of two of the men converge in the Sea of Japan-one as a 'guest' on a Russian submarine and the other aboard a U.S. Navy intelligence ship-in a meeting with grave international consequences.

The Nuclear Borderlands

Author: Joseph Masco
Editor: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691120773
File Size: 56,86 MB
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The Nuclear Borderlands explores the sociocultural fallout of twentieth-century America's premier technoscientific project--the atomic bomb. Joseph Masco offers the first anthropological study of the long-term consequences of the Manhattan Project for the people that live in and around Los Alamos, New Mexico, where the first atomic bomb, and the majority of weapons in the current U.S. nuclear arsenal, were designed. Masco examines how diverse groups--weapons scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, neighboring Pueblo Indian Nations and Nuevomexicano communities, and antinuclear activists--have engaged the U.S. nuclear weapons project in the post-Cold War period, mobilizing to debate and redefine what constitutes "national security." In a pathbreaking ethnographic analysis, Masco argues that the U.S. focus on potential nuclear apocalypse during the Cold War obscured the broader effects of the nuclear complex on American society. The atomic bomb, he demonstrates, is not just the engine of American technoscientific modernity; it has produced a new cognitive orientation toward everyday life, provoking cross-cultural experiences of what Masco calls a "nuclear uncanny." Revealing how the bomb has reconfigured concepts of time, nature, race, and citizenship, the book provides new theoretical perspectives on the origin and logic of U.S. national security culture. The Nuclear Borderlands ultimately assesses the efforts of the nuclear security state to reinvent itself in a post-Cold War world, and in so doing exposes the nuclear logic supporting the twenty-first-century U.S. war on terrorism.

Cold War Metropolis

Author: Scott Douglas Campbell
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 40,76 MB
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Berlin Wall

Author: Hans-Hermann Hertle
Editor: Ch. Links Verlag
ISBN: 9783861534631
File Size: 43,27 MB
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Over 200 previously unpublished photographs document the building and development of the many check points, barbed wire barriers, and alarmed fences which formed the concrete wall around Berlin. This book tells dramatic tales of spectacular escapes and terrible deaths, and explains the history making events surrounding the building and fall of the Wall. Contemporary photographs are contrasted with photographs from the eighties to offer surprising insights into how the former death strip has changed since 1990. Relics of the wall in the current cityscape are prominently illustrated, including remnants of the Wall itself, expanded metal lattice fences, observation towers, barbed wire and concrete posts. Also included are statistics showing the numbers of refugees and victims of the Wall, a guide to the museums and memorials and a summary of the literature and cinema treatment of the Wall, along with a brief chronicle of its history.

Spy Flights Of The Cold War

Author: Paul Lashmar
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 52,18 MB
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The author reveals the secret spyplane war which took place in the skies over Soviet Russia during the Cold War.

Geopolitics

Author: Francis P. Sempa
Editor: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412813808
File Size: 19,64 MB
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Writers, observers, and practitioners of international politics frequently invoke the term "geopolitics" to describe, explain, or analyze specific foreign policy issues and problems. Such generalized usage ignores the fact that geopolitics as a method of understanding international relations has a history that includes a common vocabulary, well-established if sometimes conflicting concepts, an extensive body of thought, and a recognized group of theorists and scholars. In Geopolitics, Francis P. Sempa presents a history of geopolitical thought and applies its classical analyses to Cold War and post-Cold War international relations. While mindful of the impact of such concepts as "globalization" and the "information revolution" on our understanding of contemporary events, Sempa emphasizes traditional geopolitical theories in explaining the outcome of the Cold War. He shows that, the struggle between the Western allies and the Soviet empire was unique in its ideological component and nuclear standoff, the Cold War fits into a recurring geopolitical pattern. It can be seen as a consequence of competition between land powers and sea powers, and between a potential Eurasian hegemonic power and a coalition of states opposed to that would-be hegemony. The collapse of the Soviet empire ended the most recent threat to global stability. Acting as a successor to the British Empire, the United States organized, funded, and led a grand coalition that successfully countered the Soviet quest for domination. No power or alliance posed an immediate threat to the global balance of power. Indeed, the end of the Cold War generated hopes for a "new world order" and predictions that economics would replace geopolitics as the driving force in international politics. Russian instability, the nuclear dimension of the India-Pakistan conflict, and Chinese bids for dominance have turned the Asia-Pacific region into what Mahan called "debatable and debated ground." Russia, Turkey, Iran, India, Pakistan, China, Japan, the Koreas, and the United States all have interests that collide in one or more of the areas of this region.

America Russia And The Cold War 1945 1990

Author: Walter LaFeber
Editor: McGraw-Hill Companies
ISBN:
File Size: 12,59 MB
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Cold War Era

Author: Monika Davies
Editor: Teacher Created Materials
ISBN: 0743967844
File Size: 49,32 MB
Format: PDF
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Two nations. Two ideologies. One Cold War. From 1947 to 1991, the United States and the Soviet Union engaged in an open rivalry known as the Cold War. Dive deep into your exploration of history with this social studies book that piques students’ curiosity about history through dynamic primary sources. Primary sources give students unique insights and personal connections to history. Examples of primary sources include images of maps, images, newspaper articles, political posters, and many more. This 32-page book includes text features that help students increase reading comprehension and their understanding of the subject. Packed with interesting facts, sidebars, and essential vocabulary, this book is perfect for reports or projects.

The United Nations In The Post Cold War Era Second Edition

Author: Karen Mingst
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1000306747
File Size: 61,10 MB
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The United Nations faced unprecedented opportunities and heightened expectations when the Cold War ended in 1990. By the time of the UN's fiftieth anniversary in 1995, the mood had shifted. Peacekeepers were bogged down in Bosnia and Somalia. Iraq continued to test the UN's resolve to enforce arms control inspections. In much of the world, the gap between haves and have-nots was increasing. Everyone agreed that UN reform was needed, yet the political will to effect change was absent. With unmet challenges throughout the world, the limits to UN power and effectiveness were being realized. From regional conflicts to areas of environmental degradation and human rights abuses, the UN's success depends more than ever on the way in which three dilemmas are resolved–the tensions between sovereignty and the reality of its erosion, between demands for global governance and the weakness of UN institutions (as well as the reluctance of states to commit), and between the need for leadership and the diffusion of power. In this second edition, the authors have undertaken major revisions along with thorough updating. They explore the three dilemmas in the context of the UN's evolving role in world politics, including its experience in maintaining peace and promoting development, environmental sustainability, and human rights–the focus of an entirely new chapter. They also consider the role of various actors in the UN system, from major powers (especially the United States), small and middle powers, coalitions, and nongovernmental organizations to the secretaries-general. The need for institutional reforms and specific proposals for reform are examined. Because multilateral diplomacy is now the norm rather than the exception in world politics, the UN's effectiveness has been challenged by the new demands of the post–Cold War era. This completely revised and updated text places the UN at the center of a set of core dilemmas in world politics and provides a series of case studies that probe the politics and processes of UN action.

Peace And The Cold War 1945 1951 Labour In Government

Author: Ernie Trory
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 58,86 MB
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Assertion Of Power And Cold War

Author: Carl Jacob Burckhardt
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 47,25 MB
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The Greater Middle East And The Cold War

Author: Roby C. Barrett
Editor: I.B. Tauris
ISBN:
File Size: 41,22 MB
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Roby C Barrett casts fresh light on US foreign policy under Eisenhower and Kennedy, illuminating the struggles of two American administrations to deal with massive social, economic, and political change in an area sharply divided by regional and Cold War rivalries. With a dramatic backdrop of revolutionary Arab nationalism, Zionism, indigenous communism, teetering colonial empires, unstable traditional monarchies, oil, territorial disputes and the threat of Soviet domination of the region, this book vividly highlights the fundamental similarities between the goals and application of foreign policy in the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations as well as the impact of British influence on the process.Drawing on extensive research in archives and document collections from Kansas to Canberra, as well as numerous interviews with key policy makers and observers from both the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations, Roby C Barrett explores the application of the Cold War containment policy through economic development and security assistance. Within the broader context of the global Cold War struggle, the Greater Middle East also held the potential as the flashpoint for nuclear war, and Barrett analyses fully the implications of this for international relations. In the process, this book draws some unexpected conclusions, arguing that Eisenhower's policies were ultimately more successful than Kennedy's, and offers an important and revisionist contribution to our understanding of the Cold War and the Middle East.

Post Cold War Conversion In Europe

Author: Jussi Jauhiainen
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 27,44 MB
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Inside The Cold War

Author: John Sharnik
Editor: Arbor House Publishing Company
ISBN:
File Size: 67,27 MB
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Examines the key personalities, issues, and events of the East-West confrontation that has overshadowed lives for over forty years

Witnesses To The End Of The Cold War

Author: Princeton Conference on the End of the Cold War
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 71,72 MB
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Why did the Cold War end as peacefully, and as suddenly, as it did? In February 1993 key diplomatic players--including former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz and his Russian counterpart, former Soviet foreign minister Alexander Bessmertnykh--gathered in Princeton, New Jersey, to exchange views on the transition to the post-Cold War world. Now, the complete transcripts of this historic three-day conference, supplemented by incisive interpretive essays by three senior political scientists, are available in William C. Wohlforth's Witnesses to the End of the Cold War. Conference participants explore the ways in which the two sides overcame domestic and international resistance to easing the U.S.-Soviet rivalry, from the tense crises of the early 1980s to the increasingly productive summits of the decade's end. They also discuss such issues as the arms buildup and reduction, management of crisis flashpoints, chief players in the Cold War thaw, the economic and political impact on Russia of the war in Afghanistan, and events at the Reykjavik Summit. In the interpretive essays, Fred Greenstein, Robert Jervis, and Alexander George discuss the role of personalities and misperception, and offer a political-psychology perspective on the Cold War's end. The book also features a preface by Don Oberdorfer and a concluding chapter by volume editor William Wohlforth, which sets the issue in the context of international relations theory. With an appendix that includes recently declassified Soviet and American documents, Witnesses to the End of the Cold War provides an intriguing firsthand account that will be of interest to students, scholars, and informed general readers alike.